Protect Your Pet from Halloween Dangers

Oct 28, 2018 | Care & Wellness, Uncategorized

Halloween is just around the corner and with it come some important things for you to consider for the safety of your furry friends!

 

Chocolate Trouble:

As you may know, certain compounds in chocolate can be toxic to dogs. The primary ones are caffeine and theobromine. These stimulate the central nervous system, alter the heart’s ability to contract normally, increase gastric secretion, and promote smooth muscle relaxation. Theobromine is especially harmful as it undergoes something called enterohepatic recirculation. This occurs with certain drugs where they are reabsorbed from the intestine and then reprocessed in the liver, prolonging the physical signs of toxicosis.

These may vary depending on what type of chocolate was consumed, how much your pet ate, and the size of your pet. At home, chocolate toxicosis can look like vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, agitation, abnormal behavior, seizures and death.

If you know that your pet ate any chocolate try to keep the wrapper and call a veterinarian or poison control immediately. Helpful information to have on hand for your vet or poison control when you call: your pet’s weight, the type of chocolate (brand can be helpful) and about how many ounces were consumed. If the medical professional can determine that your pet did ingest a toxic amount of chocolate, treatment depends on several factors. If your pet just ingested the chocolate and not much time has passed, you have a chance of safely inducing vomiting – this is the quickest and most inexpensive way to deal with chocolate ingestion, so make sure you don’t wait too long before calling!

If too much time has passed or if the amount ingested poses a serious threat, you’ll have to bring your pet into an emergency center so its body can be flushed with intravenous fluids. The doctors may also recommend oral activated charcoal. Happily, the prognosis is excellent with prompt care and the above recommendations.

Other Candied Culprits

Although chocolate tends to be the main player in our candy warning section, some sugar-free candy options can actually be just as, if not more, dangerous. Xylitol is a type of sweetener in some treats and almost all sugar-free gum—plus some types of peanut butter. While it is a wonderful cavity preventing sweetener for humans, dogs who ingest xylitol experience dramatic increases in insulin which make their blood glucose plummet dangerously. Some dogs also will experience acute liver injury and failure. Onset of clinical signs due to hypoglycemia is relatively rapid (30-60 minutes) so if your pet has been unsupervised around gum or candy and you note staggering, anorexia, vomiting, seizures or coma, contact a veterinarian immediately.

Treatment involves hospitalization. If the pet recently ate the candy or gum and is neurologically normal, vomiting is induced. If this is not an option, however, hospitalization, fluid therapy, blood glucose management with intravenous dextrose and close monitoring are required. Prognosis for dogs with hypoglycemia who are treated is excellent, however if liver injury or failure are present prognosis is more guarded.

Bottom line: Keep all gum and candy away from pups –especially if it is sugar free!

Stranger Danger

The holidays are a busy time with many unfamiliar people in and around your house, and Halloween is no different. It’s a day when many strangers are ringing your doorbell and yelling trick or treat. For some animals, this is an awesome experience and others ignore it altogether. There are some, however, that struggle with the very real stress that increased numbers of people, noise and decorations bring. Some pets will have shown anxiety or fearful behaviors in response to the doorbell or strangers before, but not always. Pay close attention to how your pet is feeling and responding to the doorbell and the different people and decorations.

If you notice that your pet is acting stressed, hiding, or barking when the doorbell rings, it may be prudent to try to set up a calm, quiet space for them away from this area of the house as much as possible. Using sound machines (if well tolerated), treats and comfortable blankets in a low stimulation area can be great ways to help your pet chill out and relax.

Keep in mind that pets can rush out of open doors so it is essential for your safety, their safety and the safety of the trick-or-treaters that you have your pet on a leash or confined somewhere so that they cannot escape in a panic (or for a joy-run around the neighborhood!). There are a lot of people out on Halloween so use common sense and avoid letting your pets run unsupervised.

Costumes:

If you have an anxious pet, it might not be a great idea to force them into wearing a costume. Although adorable and photo-worthy, costumes can increase anxiety and fear in some dogs, cats or other animals and this can exacerbate developing behavioral problems. So pay close attention to see if your pet loves dressing up or if that might be something to leave to the humans in your family.

As always, if you ever have any questions or concerns—don’t hesitate to call VETSS—we are always here to help- no matter what time.

And have a safe and Happy Halloween!!

For more information, contact our team at VETSS!

Winter Hazards For Pets in the Charlottesville Area

During the holidays people enjoy the festivities inside the household and keeping warm. But, with the holidays also comes cold weather. Pet owners should be aware of how winter weather is hazardous to pets. Every breed of animal handles cold weather differently, but...

Protect Your Pet from Halloween Dangers

Halloween is just around the corner and with it come some important things for you to consider for the safety of your furry friends!   Chocolate Trouble: As you may know, certain compounds in chocolate can be toxic to dogs. The primary ones are caffeine and...

Don’t Let Parvo Take Your Precious Puppy

Parvo is a particularly nasty viral disease that wages a two-fold attack on your dog’s health. First, it attacks the immune system, then it destroys the cells that create the lining to the animal’s intestines. By lowering the immune system and destroying the natural...

The Katie Fund: Our Commitment to Compassionate Care, No Matter the Cost

VETSS has established the Katie McCauley Fund to assist caring and deserving pet owners who are faced with unexpected expenses in caring for pets that have become acutely ill or injured. This fund is used to cover expenses incurred while caring for injured lost or...

Resource Topics

With Rising Veterinary costs, is Pet Insurance Right For You?

Even the best pet-parents can’t prevent every illness or accident. And many people are not prepared for the high cost...

When Warm Weather Returns, So Do Ticks

The groundhog didn’t see his shadow this year, so as we approach an early spring it is time to consider parasite...

1 month ago

Veterinary Emergency Treatment Services & Specialty

Congratulations to our employees of the Month, Kelly Jordan and Rachel Bradley.

Kelly has been with VETSS team since 2013. She graduated from BRCC in 2018, obtaining her license as a veterinary technician. In her spare time, she volunteers with local rescues, runs a hobby farm, and enjoys gardening, camping, and kayaking. Kelly has a special place in her heart for special needs animals and has found her niche in emergency medicine, exotics, and behavior.

Rachel has worked in veterinary clinics for over ten years. In 2016 she graduated from BRCC and became a licensed veterinary technician. Rachel has loved animals all her life. She strongly believes in compassionate care and in her calling to help animals. Her professional interests include dermatology, behavior, and emergency medicine.

Rachel lives in Staunton with her partner Taryn, two dogs, and three cats. She plans to get a few guinea fowl in the near future.
... See MoreSee Less

Congratulations to our employees of the Month, Kelly Jordan and Rachel Bradley.

Kelly has been with VETSS team since 2013. She graduated from BRCC in 2018, obtaining her license as a veterinary technician. In her spare time, she volunteers with local rescues, runs a hobby farm, and enjoys gardening, camping, and kayaking.  Kelly has a special place in her heart for special needs animals and has found her niche in emergency medicine, exotics, and behavior.

Rachel has worked in veterinary clinics for over ten years. In 2016 she graduated from BRCC and became a licensed veterinary technician. Rachel has loved animals all her life. She strongly believes in compassionate care and in her calling to help animals. Her professional interests include dermatology, behavior, and emergency medicine.

Rachel lives in Staunton with her partner Taryn, two dogs, and three cats. She plans to get a few guinea fowl in the near future.Image attachment

 

Comment on Facebook

Congratulations Kelly. So proud of you. Love you and keep on being the best you can be.

Congratulations Kelly!

Way to go ladies!!!

Congratulations 🍾

SUPERCALOUSFRAJALISTIC!

Congratulations

Congratulations

Oh yes !

Go Kelly Renee Jordan and Rachel Bradley you guys deserve it!!

+ View previous comments

2 months ago

Veterinary Emergency Treatment Services & Specialty

Thank you Chad Kildea for making this beautiful sign. If this candle is lit, someone is saying goodbye to their dearly beloved pet. ❤️ ... See MoreSee Less

Thank you Chad Kildea for making this beautiful sign. If this candle is lit, someone is saying goodbye to their dearly beloved pet. ❤️

 

Comment on Facebook

Every vet should have this sign!

Just over 6 months ago we were facing this heartbreaking moment. Luckily Dr. McKenna was able to save our Teagan. This is such a beautiful sign and gesture. We love VETSS ❤️

Morgan Gray your office!!

Forest Lakes Veterinary Hospital also has this sign and candle. 💕💔💕

Wonderful idea.😢

This is beautiful. We love vetss!!

I LOVE this!!!!! 🙂

That's beautiful!

That is beautiful! (Chad Kildea, haven’t seen you since you and Morgan played together as kids!)

Absolutely love this ♥️🐾

+ View previous comments

2 months ago

Veterinary Emergency Treatment Services & Specialty

Update on the paving! Paving was postponed due to the icy weather we had on the 16th. Paving will be completed TOMORROW. We will still be open, just please park on the little side road in front of the clinic. Thank you!Hello lovely clients and furry friends! We wanted to let you know that on November 15th and November 16th our parking lot is getting repaved. We will still be open of course during this time, but our parking lot will not be accessible. You can park on the side road that is directly in front of our building. You will see our staff cars parked here as well.
Don’t worry- on the 17th our parking lot will be back and accessible as normal, just a lot nicer!! Yay!

Here is a diagram letting you know what will be paved and roped off.

Thank you for your understanding and we apologize for any inconvenience.
... See MoreSee Less

Update on the paving! Paving was postponed due to the icy weather we had on the 16th. Paving will be completed TOMORROW. We will  still be open, just please park on the little side road in front of the clinic. Thank you!
Load more