Don’t Let Parvo Take Your Precious Puppy

Sep 5, 2018 | Infectious Diseases, Uncategorized

Parvo is a particularly nasty viral disease that wages a two-fold attack on your dog’s health. First, it attacks the immune system, then it destroys the cells that create the lining to the animal’s intestines. By lowering the immune system and destroying the natural lining on the intestines, the virus sets the patient up for secondary infections. Also, since the gastrointestinal tract has been destroyed, patients often develop life threatening dehydration. Parvo either kills through fluid loss and dehydration or through a secondary whole body bacterial infection as bacteria crosses the ruined intestinal barriers.

Unfortunately, parvo is common in young dogs or dogs that have never been exposed to the virus or been given a vaccine. Once infected, the virus is shed in large numbers by the dog. The virus itself is extremely stable in the environment and can re-infect naïve animals for over two years. Parvo is species specific so does not affect children or people in the house, but a newer form of the parvovirus can spread from dogs to cats.

That’s the bad news. Here’s the good: Parvo is COMPLETELY preventable through vaccines. Puppies can be born with maternal antibodies if their mother had been vaccinated. In some cases, these vaccines can last up to three or four months after they are born. This is why most veterinarians recommend starting vaccines at six to 8 weeks of age. Once vaccinated it takes 3 to 4 weeks for the body to recognize and produce antibodies to viruses. If vaccinated at 6-8 weeks, this puts them developing their own immunity just as the maternal antibody wears off. It is important to complete the full vaccine series to ensure that your pet is properly protected. Parvo vaccines are usually pretty cheap, and are typically guaranteed by the company that produced them. That is, they will pay for the treatment of your pet if they were correctly vaccinated and developed this terrible disease.

Over the counter vaccines are available. However, these usually do not come with guarantees and past problems with non-veterinary handling have caused some to be ineffective.

Of course, it’s your choice to vaccinate your pet. If you choose not to, prepare for the possibility of a bad medical battle. Treatment can mean a stay of up to 7 days in hospital with aggressive care. It can include blood transfusions. Treatment is extremely expensive, but around 80% of all puppies recover completely. After being treated, your pet should stay isolated from other animals for up to three months, as they can still be pass the virus to others.

Without treatment, prognosis is poor.

For more information, contact our team at VETSS!

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1 month ago

Veterinary Emergency Treatment Services & Specialty

Congratulations to our employees of the Month, Kelly Jordan and Rachel Bradley.

Kelly has been with VETSS team since 2013. She graduated from BRCC in 2018, obtaining her license as a veterinary technician. In her spare time, she volunteers with local rescues, runs a hobby farm, and enjoys gardening, camping, and kayaking. Kelly has a special place in her heart for special needs animals and has found her niche in emergency medicine, exotics, and behavior.

Rachel has worked in veterinary clinics for over ten years. In 2016 she graduated from BRCC and became a licensed veterinary technician. Rachel has loved animals all her life. She strongly believes in compassionate care and in her calling to help animals. Her professional interests include dermatology, behavior, and emergency medicine.

Rachel lives in Staunton with her partner Taryn, two dogs, and three cats. She plans to get a few guinea fowl in the near future.
... See MoreSee Less

Congratulations to our employees of the Month, Kelly Jordan and Rachel Bradley.

Kelly has been with VETSS team since 2013. She graduated from BRCC in 2018, obtaining her license as a veterinary technician. In her spare time, she volunteers with local rescues, runs a hobby farm, and enjoys gardening, camping, and kayaking.  Kelly has a special place in her heart for special needs animals and has found her niche in emergency medicine, exotics, and behavior.

Rachel has worked in veterinary clinics for over ten years. In 2016 she graduated from BRCC and became a licensed veterinary technician. Rachel has loved animals all her life. She strongly believes in compassionate care and in her calling to help animals. Her professional interests include dermatology, behavior, and emergency medicine.

Rachel lives in Staunton with her partner Taryn, two dogs, and three cats. She plans to get a few guinea fowl in the near future.Image attachment

 

Comment on Facebook

Congratulations Kelly. So proud of you. Love you and keep on being the best you can be.

Congratulations Kelly!

Way to go ladies!!!

Congratulations 🍾

SUPERCALOUSFRAJALISTIC!

Congratulations

Congratulations

Oh yes !

Go Kelly Renee Jordan and Rachel Bradley you guys deserve it!!

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2 months ago

Veterinary Emergency Treatment Services & Specialty

Thank you Chad Kildea for making this beautiful sign. If this candle is lit, someone is saying goodbye to their dearly beloved pet. ❤️ ... See MoreSee Less

Thank you Chad Kildea for making this beautiful sign. If this candle is lit, someone is saying goodbye to their dearly beloved pet. ❤️

 

Comment on Facebook

Every vet should have this sign!

Just over 6 months ago we were facing this heartbreaking moment. Luckily Dr. McKenna was able to save our Teagan. This is such a beautiful sign and gesture. We love VETSS ❤️

Morgan Gray your office!!

Forest Lakes Veterinary Hospital also has this sign and candle. 💕💔💕

Wonderful idea.😢

This is beautiful. We love vetss!!

I LOVE this!!!!! 🙂

That's beautiful!

That is beautiful! (Chad Kildea, haven’t seen you since you and Morgan played together as kids!)

Absolutely love this ♥️🐾

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2 months ago

Veterinary Emergency Treatment Services & Specialty

Update on the paving! Paving was postponed due to the icy weather we had on the 16th. Paving will be completed TOMORROW. We will still be open, just please park on the little side road in front of the clinic. Thank you!Hello lovely clients and furry friends! We wanted to let you know that on November 15th and November 16th our parking lot is getting repaved. We will still be open of course during this time, but our parking lot will not be accessible. You can park on the side road that is directly in front of our building. You will see our staff cars parked here as well.
Don’t worry- on the 17th our parking lot will be back and accessible as normal, just a lot nicer!! Yay!

Here is a diagram letting you know what will be paved and roped off.

Thank you for your understanding and we apologize for any inconvenience.
... See MoreSee Less

Update on the paving! Paving was postponed due to the icy weather we had on the 16th. Paving will be completed TOMORROW. We will  still be open, just please park on the little side road in front of the clinic. Thank you!
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